Reflections on Resilience

Yes, broken!

  Q: Hey, how are you? A: Okay. Q: Just okay? A: Yes.     Have you had this conversation or one similar to this with anyone in the past year?  Maybe you’ve felt broken and said so out loud.  And maybe in response, someone has said something like:   “You’re not broken. With hard work, a positive attitude and setting an intention to become whole, you can transform your cracks and fractures into something beautiful.”   Can we stop making it sound as if brokenness is a tiny puddle one can easily step over in order to start on the ...
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puzzling

  I love puzzles.  Crossword Jigsaw Lateral thinking Crime dramas (especially something from BBC) that can be on the darker side but with a minimal amount of gore and gratuitous violence Noticing my behaviour and the behaviour of others to solve the puzzle of ‘why"   Because I've been told that I leave no stone unturned in my attempt to solve life’s puzzles, it seems to suggest that my puzzling borders on obsession and less on casual interest.   Recently, while watching the surprisingly diverse wildlife embracing spring in our city backyard, my partner made an observation.  He noticed that ...
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grit and bear it

  On the first day of Grade 8, the homeroom teacher, Mr. Couch asked us to write a letter to ourselves that would be sealed in an envelope and returned to us on the last day of school.    The social and sensory overwhelm of school often took its toll on me so I was thrilled at the prospect of such a solitary and thoughtful task.  I loved the time given for silent reflection and the earnestness I had, that was not so popular in grade school, was free to be expressed in those moments with pen, paper and a ...
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have you tried pipe cleaners?

“You look like you’re on a mission”. Out of breath and not really in the mood to chat, I reluctantly slowed down, stopping about 10 feet away from the person who called out to me. I replied that I was walking at a good pace to burn off some nervous energy on a brisk January day after spending the morning unsuccessfully trying to avoid the weight of world news that left me with a buzzing mind and a clenched body. “Have you tried pipe cleaners?” I had to admit that I hadn’t. “Pipe cleaners?” I asked. Apparently pipe cleaners can ...
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letting go

  The first clear memory I have of the concept of "letting go" was the first time I ever went water skiing.  I was young and not very physically active so it didn’t take long before I was down.   With the water rushing loudly passed my ears, I couldn’t hear the screams from those on the boat telling me to let go of the tow rope.  Instead, I remained like a fish on a hook being dragged in against its will and ultimate fate.    I surprisingly don’t have a lot of residual humiliation about this event since I it ...
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sheltering in place

“Barn’s burnt down - Now I can see the moon” (Mizuta Masahide)     As I sit here cocooning in my favourite wrap, on the cusp of another probable lockdown, I am contemplating the coming winter and feeling in need of a sheltering plan.  The impact of being more housebound than usual with still limited or distanced contact with extended family and with friends is weightier than winters that have come before.        In preparation for the darker, colder days, we put our gardens to bed. We put shorts and T-shirts in storage and make sure scarves, mittens ...
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pomegranate perspectives

  My partner is almost a whole foot taller than I am.  This significant height gap means, among other things, that I am addressed frequently with Tolkien-inspired nicknames.    It also comes with bouts of teasing about how it can possibly be that someone as short as I am can have so many opinions.   I like to think of it as doing the best I can with what I was given!   The difference in our height also literally impacts what we see and the way we each see it.  This is never clearer than in the midst of ...
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a modest harvest

  If you looked at our backyard in Google Earth, you would mostly see a canopy of green and very little else.  The abundance of shade, the variety of textures and colours and the role the trees play in balancing out the oxygen and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are just some of the benefits of our tiny forest.   We also enjoy how many critters frequent our urban wild space and that makes for quite a bit of natural entertainment.   But there is a downside to this canopied space. Our attempts at growing food have been nothing short of ...
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come to your senses

Baby Ways As newborns, we explored the world and learned primarily through our senses. With no ability to communicate through conversation, we grasped the outreached fingers of our caregivers and clung to colourful toys. We drooled as we gummed on teething rings or our fingers and toes. We rolled our bodies on soft blankets on the floor and dabbled in a variety of vocal experiments.   Toddling On Then, as toddlers, we left no stone unturned to crawl all over our environment, climbed on furniture and repurposed ordinary cardboard boxes for creative play. While using words became more common as ...
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soothing manoeuvers – introduction to video series

  The School of Life has an absolutely lovely post titled “How We Crave to Be Soothed”.  The simple act of reading it was a refreshing as an afternoon nap.   Or having an unexpected day off.   Within the lines of this gem is where the phrase “soothing manoeuvers” tugged me by the ear to come closer, lean in and listen to the poetry of calm.    I enjoy reading the School of Life essays and not just because I'm a fan of British-speak like "having a small lie down" for resting or eating something as "taking a tray".  I ...
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